richard thompson

Friday September 4, 2020 7:30pm

Friday September 4, 2020 7:30pm

$40 Advance / $140 Premium Seats / $50 Day of Show

$40 Advance / $140 Premium Seats / $50 Day of Show

The Los Angeles Times describes Ivor Novello Award-winning and Grammy Award-nominated music legend Richard Thompson as “The finest rock songwriter after Dylan and the best electric guitarist since Hendrix.” His trademark fleet-fingered fretwork, poetic songwriting, and impassioned picking comprise his nineteenth and most recent solo album, 13 Rivers. Born in 1949 in Notting Hill, West London, Richard Thompson first rose to prominence in the late 1960s as the lead guitarist and songwriter for the folk-rock group Fairport Convention. After departing the group, he produced six albums with then-wife Linda Thompson, including the critically acclaimed I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight (1974) and Shoot Out the Lights (1982). After the dissolution of the duo, Thompson revived his solo career with the release of Hand of Kindness in 1983. Three of his albums – Rumor and Sigh (1991), You? Me? Us? (1996), and Dream Attic (2010) – have been nominated for Grammy Awards, while Still (2015) was his first UK Top Ten album. 13 Rivers, released in 2018, is his nineteenth and most recent solo album. He continues to write and record new material regularly, and frequently performs live at venues throughout the world. He will perform solo acoustic at this show. His songwriting has earned him an Ivor Novello Award, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Americana Music Association in Nashville, and a 2006 lifetime achievement award from BBC Radio. Powered by evocative songcraft, jaw-dropping guitar playing, and indefinable spirit, this venerable icon holds a coveted spot on Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” list. 2011 saw Thompson receive an OBE (Order of the British Empire) personally bestowed upon him by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace. His 1991 song “1952 Vincent Black Lightning” was included in Time magazine’s “All Time 100 Songs” list of the best English-language musical compositions released between 1923 and 2011.
The Los Angeles Times describes Ivor Novello Award-winning and Grammy Award-nominated music legend Richard Thompson as “The finest rock songwriter after Dylan and the best electric guitarist since Hendrix.” His trademark fleet-fingered fretwork, poetic songwriting, and impassioned picking comprise his nineteenth and most recent solo album, 13 Rivers. Born in 1949 in Notting Hill, West London, Richard Thompson first rose to prominence in the late 1960s as the lead guitarist and songwriter for the folk-rock group Fairport Convention. After departing the group, he produced six albums with then-wife Linda Thompson, including the critically acclaimed I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight (1974) and Shoot Out the Lights (1982). After the dissolution of the duo, Thompson revived his solo career with the release of Hand of Kindness in 1983. Three of his albums – Rumor and Sigh (1991), You? Me? Us? (1996), and Dream Attic (2010) – have been nominated for Grammy Awards, while Still (2015) was his first UK Top Ten album. 13 Rivers, released in 2018, is his nineteenth and most recent solo album. He continues to write and record new material regularly, and frequently performs live at venues throughout the world. He will perform solo acoustic at this show. His songwriting has earned him an Ivor Novello Award, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Americana Music Association in Nashville, and a 2006 lifetime achievement award from BBC Radio. Powered by evocative songcraft, jaw-dropping guitar playing, and indefinable spirit, this venerable icon holds a coveted spot on Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” list. 2011 saw Thompson receive an OBE (Order of the British Empire) personally bestowed upon him by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace. His 1991 song “1952 Vincent Black Lightning” was included in Time magazine’s “All Time 100 Songs” list of the best English-language musical compositions released between 1923 and 2011.
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